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Timmins, Ontario Real Estate and Homes for Sale
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Timmins

Timmins is a city in northeastern Ontario, Canada on the Mattagami River. At the time of the Canada 2011 Census, Timmins' population was 43,165. At 2,961.52 square kilometres (1,143.45 sq mi), Timmins was Canada's largest municipality in land area until 1995, when the regional municipality of Wood Buffalo, Alberta, was created, although it remained the largest municipality in Ontario until 2001, when it was superseded by the newly amalgamated cities of Kawartha Lakes and Greater Sudbury. It is the 69th largest metropolitan area in Canada, although the statistical boundaries for Timmins' metropolitan area coincide with its municipal boundaries.Archaeological and historical studies indicate that the first people to settle in the Timmins area were nomadic tribes such as Ojibwa and Cree dating back to 7000 BC. Timmins was a company town founded in 1912. However, South Porcupine and Schumacher were formed in 1911.During the late 17th century, explorers and fur traders established outposts in the north to capitalize on the fur trade. The Hudson's Bay Company and the North West Company later developed several trading posts along major routes in northern Ontario. The rivalry between these two trading companies resulted in the need to get their furs to market as soon as possible and this led to the development of the Porcupine Trail, a trading route that connected the Abitibi River to the Mattagami River and passed directly through present-day Timmins.In reaction to favorable provincial Geological Survey reports, construction of the railway northward, and major silver discoveries in Cobalt in 1907, the region became a popular destination and home to dozens of prospectors eager to explore the areas around Porcupine Lake. After several false starts, in 1909 two prospectors discovered the "Golden Staircase", a rich vein of gold that led to the Dome Mine. Within days the Porcupine Gold Rush began, and a huge mining camp formed at Porcupine Lake, a few kilometers east of modern Timmins. The Porcupine Camp is one of the first localities in the world to have its entire history documented by photography: Harry Peters photographed the Porcupine Camp from its inception, and documented the Great Fire of 1911. Shortly after the completion in 1911 of a new spur line of the Temiskaming & Northern Ontario Railway, the Great Porcupine Fire swept through the camp, causing great loss of property and more than 200 deaths.The Town of Timmins was founded by Noah Timmins in 1912 following gold discoveries in the Porcupine Camp. By 1912 the Hollinger, MacIntyre, and Big Dome Mines were founded. The new town had already grown larger than the original mining camps to the east on Porcupine Lake. Shortly after Timmins was founded it experienced its first general mine strike in November, 1912. Mine operators hired gun thugs during the 1912-1913 strike, prompting the intervention of the Ontario Provincial Police, which had itself been formed in 1909 partly in response to lawlessness connected with the gold rush.

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